Climate Responsibility: Strengthening the Existing Frameworks

Although the Paris Agreement rules that states must all do what they can to keep global warming below 1.5°C, it does not provide binding requirements on how they should do so, in accordance with the principle of “common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities”. It also does not bind corporations, who are the world’s largest GHG emitters. Although the Paris Agreement and the NDCs are the best climate framework we have been able to develop to this day, there are ways in which they could be strengthened. We could establish clear minimum emission requirements, for instance, or apply a similar framework of NDCs to large businesses.

Categories Climate Justice

Climate Responsibility: Principles and Frameworks

One of the biggest challenges in setting out frameworks to address climate change is determining how to attribute responsibility and how to share the burden of emission reduction measures. Despite the fact that not all states are equally responsible for the climate crisis and do not have the same ability to respond to it, under the Paris Agreement they must all do what they can to keep global warming below 1.5°C.

Categories Climate Justice

Kiribati Relocation Strategy: An Exploration Of The Risks Kiribati Faces If Sea Levels Continue To Rise

This article examines the debates surrounding the future of small island nations such as Kiribati, which may completely disappear under the rising sea in the next 25 years. Rather than becoming “climate refugees” the I-Kiribati would prefer to move legally, with their rights fully respected, either as skilled workers or as part of a “deliberate relocation strategy” to Fiji. This too, however, doesn’t come without its challenges. - According to the IPCC Kiribati may completely disappear by 2050. - There is no legal status for so-called “climate refugees”, so what are people forcefully displaced by the climate crisis? The I-Kiribati do not want to become “climate refugees” and are pursuing, instead, “Migration with Dignity” and the possibility of relocation to Fiji.

Categories Climate Justice